Diana Wehbe shares her story of ‘prayer, patience, purpose’

Photo/Cynthia Mendoza Diana Wehbe, front, sitting, with her Purpose Foundation team of volunteers: back, from left: Paula Cabral, Michelle Cabral, Esther Cedano, Irene Guerrero, Nyomi Ward, Megan Whynott, Marcella Powers and Jennifer Braze.

Photo/Cynthia Mendoza
Diana Wehbe, front, sitting, with her Purpose Foundation team of volunteers: back, from left: Paula Cabral, Michelle Cabral, Esther Cedano, Irene Guerrero, Nyomi Ward, Megan Whynott, Marcella Powers and Jennifer Braze.

By Cynthia Mendoza

Anyone at any age would be devastated by the news that they might have cancer, but for a 25-year-old it would almost seem like a certain death sentence in the prime of life. A diagnosis of Type II diabetes shortly thereafter seems to seal the sentence.
That’s what happened to Diana Wehbe, 27, from 99.1 KGGI almost two years ago.
The established medical profession offered her a few options, including surgery to remove a large cyst from her ovaries and hormone medication.
By that point in her life Wehbe, who’s been at 99.1 for six years, realized that something in her life had to give in a big, big way, but not just physically; personally and spiritually as well.
Taking a huge leap of faith, she refused surgery and medication and decided to pursue healing from the inside out through faith, prayer, patience and finding meaningful purpose.
“I never asked God ‘why’,” she said. “I asked him, ‘what is the purpose in this,’” she said about her approach to changing her life. “He answered me in bits and pieces.”

Courtesy Photo Top photo, Diana Wehbe with then San Bernardino Mayor Pat Morris in 2013; bottom photo, with Terrance Stone of Young Visionaries, in 2013. Wehbe will be helping Young Visionaries plant an organic vegetable garden at their homeless youth shelter.

Courtesy Photo
Top photo, Diana Wehbe with then San Bernardino Mayor Pat Morris in 2013; bottom photo, with Terrance Stone of Young Visionaries, in 2013. Wehbe will be helping Young Visionaries plant an organic vegetable garden at their homeless youth shelter.

Part of those bits and pieces included choosing to take a natural approach to health and healing. Her doctor didn’t think she could do it; she advised Wehbe to take ‘baby steps’ in changing her health, but Wehbe refused.
“I didn’t have time for baby steps,” Wehbe said. “I need to make immediate changes.”
And that’s just what she did.
In a period of 10 months she lost 100 pounds by changing her diet to organic and vegan, getting physically active, pursuing God in a way she’d never done before and generally making decisions that resulted in letting go of detrimental influences, lifestyle and relationships that were leading to nowhere.
The choice to not seek surgery or medication was a risky one that could have ended her life, but it’s a decision that she’s forever grateful that she made in faith.
“If I’d had surgery I never would have changed who I am,” she said. “The cyst would be gone but I would still be dating the wrong guys, have low self-esteem and eating the same way.”
The process between point A and B may have been immediate and quick, but it wasn’t an easy one. There were many times of discouragement and even apparent setbacks, like the cyst growing even larger at one point. But through it all, Wehbe learned to keep trusting that she was on the right path and moving forward in faith and prayer.
Today, she is diabetes and pain-free. The cyst is still there, but it is no longer causing her debilitating pain and it serves as a reminder to stay on track in life.
“The small amount of pain I experience keeps me focused and it teaches me that I walk besides people, not ahead of them,” she said.
Part of that journey includes sharing her message of prayer, patience, purpose and food, faith and fitness through her self-published book (available on Amazon.com) and The Purpose Foundation.
Through the Purpose Tour, Wehbe reaches out to hundreds of young people, namely high school and college students, to share her message of purpose and hope. In her message however, she doesn’t just focus solely on food and fitness or superficial feel-good messages.
Wehbe is very bold about her faith in God and the role he plays in her life, and makes she it clear that she will not leave out that component out of her message, no matter where she’s speaking. She feels that to do so would be to leave out the most important part of her story.
“The joy in what I do comes from the miracle,” she says. “I now have purpose in my life and I have to continue to walk this faith walk.”
Her advice to anyone struggling with discouragement or adversity?
“Prayer, patience and purpose; that’s the order in which God changed my life,” she said. “Pray to find the patience to find that purpose that God has in your pain. There’s always a purpose, it’s never pain for no reason.”
Diana Wehbe will be bringing The Purpose Tour to Pacific High School, Eisenhower High and A.B. Miller High later this month.
For more information visit http://www.purposeteam.org Her website also has much more information about other components of the work that she does including helping low-income communities plant organic gardens.
Follow Diana Wehbe on Twitter @DianaWehbe; Instagram @dianamwehbe and on Facebook at Facebook.com/dianamwehbe or hashtag #PrayerPatiencePurpose.
You may listen to her live on the Morning Show on 99.1 KGGI with Evelyn Erives and John Magic from 5:30 to 10 a.m. and then on her own midday show, which focuses on faith, food, fitness and community, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily.

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