Don’t leave children car warns SB County’s Children’s Network

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courtesy photo/children’s network San Bernardino County Children’s Network is reminding residents that while temperatures are in the 80’s outside, temperatures can climb past 120 degree inside of car. On Tuesday morning, numbers were already climbing before 11 a.m.
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Children’s Network is reminding residents that temperatures inside of cars can climb quickly, becoming fatal — a reminder to never leave a child alone in a vehicle.

To raise awareness of the dangers of vehicular-induced heatstroke, the nonprofit this week displayed a large digital thermometer outside of its San Bernardino office, measuring temperatures inside and outside of a vehicle.

By 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, outside temperatures read 86.4 degrees while inside of the vehicle, triple-digit temperatures soared to 120 degree and continued to climb.

“As outside temperatures rise, the risks of children dying from being left alone inside hot vehicles also rise,” said Network Officer Kathy Turnbull, in a news release.

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A child’s temperature can rise three to five times faster than adults and even with outside temps in the 80s, the interior of a car can heat up above 120 degrees, turning deadly in minutes, Turnbull said.

courtesy photo/children’s network    A digital thermometer shows temperatures inside and outside of a vehicle.
courtesy photo/children’s network
A digital thermometer shows temperatures inside and outside of a vehicle.

“These deaths can be prevented and it is our hope that we can continue to raise awareness about the simple steps that can be taken to save children’s lives.”

Nationwide, in 2016, there have been 23 heatstroke deaths of children in vehicles. Last year there were 24 deaths—including one child in Pomona, according to the news release.

The Children’s Network offers the following to prevent heatstroke risks for children left in hot cars:

•Never leave a child in a vehicle unattended.

•Always look in the back seat every time you exit a vehicle and always lock a vehicle car and put the keys out of a child’s reach.

•When you see a child alone in a hot vehicle, it is important to ensure the child is okay and responsive (if a child is not okay, one should, call 911 immediately).

•An effort should be made to locate the parents, such as having the facility’s security or management page the car owner over the PA system. If the child is not responsive and appears in great distress, one should attempt to get into the car to assist the child, even if that means breaking a window.

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